Invisible

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Bruce, 1980-

“She was a 19 years old Caucasian. She committed suicide, and they found a note on her body. The note said, ‘Thank you for the acknowledgment, it feels good when you’re invisible.’ That’s all the note said.”

It is a big challenge to think positive, I guess in anybody’s shoes. But I will say, in going through what I’ve been going through, when you’re down and out and you’re doing your best to think positive, being acknowledged makes a huge difference. For some people more than others, but it can help to push on and move forward. Well, with that being said, thank you for stopping, he smiles.

So, starting around 6 a.m., moving around, and as traffic walks by me, trying to get a complete stranger’s attention, saying ‘excuse me’. I didn’t get any response, I didn’t get no sign of acknowledgment; barely any eye contact. Nobody said ‘good luck’, nobody said ‘hello’, or ‘I’m sorry, I’m not able to help.’ Between the hour of 6 a.m. and 11 a.m., I felt so invisible. On my part, I give space and comfort, I live and let live. If somebody goes by, I don’t pursue, I say ‘excuse me’ once, and I let it be. But nobody looked over their shoulder to see who said ‘excuse me’. If someone said, ‘I don’t want to be bothered’, I’d have said, ‘Sorry, I give you your space and comfort, thank you for saying something’. And I try to think positive in return, but I wish there was more open-mindedness. I was hoping most people would have the same upbringing as my parents’: treat others as you want to be treated.

Let me tell you a story, something that happened to a female in San Francisco, earlier this year, February 21st, I believe. She was a 19 years old Caucasian. She committed suicide, and they found a note on her body. The note said, ‘Thank you for the acknowledgment, it feels good when you’re invisible.’ That’s all the note said.

If I need to ask for help from a stranger, I would rather be hungry than be invisible, any day, literally speaking. Think if the tables were turned around. I wish I could give a reminder, like on a billboard, instead of advertisement for products to be sold, it will be a reminder for the public to treat others how you want to be treated, or it would say, remember to acknowledge your surroundings. But I don’t want to talk just from the homeless point of view. If there’s any discomfort, it is OK to keep your distance, smiling or a nod of the head; some sign of acknowledgment, but don’t totally ignore.



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